Questions: Spectrum Analyzer

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Re: Questions: Spectrum Analyzer

Postby hh97 » Fri 12 Nov , 2010 4:21 pm

Hi Florin,
Your analyser looks very good! I'm super impressed :D
My question is will future versions be able to show the bass audio frequencies in audio such as below 100Hz/cycles per second?
If it could show a range more like the ⅓ octave frequency range that would be really great! :) :D :D
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Re: Questions: Spectrum Analyzer

Postby Florin » Fri 12 Nov , 2010 5:31 pm

Hello,
this feature hasn't been requested so far. Do you own a spectrum analyzer ? if the answer is yes you've probably noticed that the analyzed bands are not perfectly centered, it's just impossible to do that on the current setup and technique that is used to analyze the signal. So what I am trying to say it that you will notice that the the spectrum analyzer responds rather well on the 100Hz column, even if it get lower frequency signal.

I will take note on your idea and if more users request it might be possible with future revisions.
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Re: Questions: Spectrum Analyzer

Postby hh97 » Fri 12 Nov , 2010 7:18 pm

Florin wrote:Hello,
this feature hasn't been requested so far. Do you own a spectrum analyzer ? if the answer is yes you've probably noticed that the analyzed bands are not perfectly centered, it's just impossible to do that on the current setup and technique that is used to analyze the signal. So what I am trying to say it that you will notice that the the spectrum analyzer responds rather well on the 100Hz column, even if it get lower frequency signal.

I will take note on your idea and if more users request it might be possible with future revisions.


Thanks for the very fast reply! :D No, I don't own or have access to a hardware analyser, but I have used one in the distant past, a big HP one that was very expensive!!
I often have to work with speech audio (on PC) and so I am very familiar with equalizers and spectrum graphs from there. I am understanding the basics of FFT filters etc, I have a book on PIC microcontrollers/assembler and got lost so I know that what you have achieved is not at all easy, especially in real-time!!
Just wondered why the frequencies for your analyser were like they are/were. That was the only thing that stopped me from buying your kit when I saw the YTube vid a while ago - the 'missing' lower frequency bars. I think I'll wait and see what your V3 brings, I'll keep a look out!!!! :D
Thanks again!!
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Re: Questions: Spectrum Analyzer

Postby Florin » Fri 12 Nov , 2010 7:44 pm

The V3 isn't coming out right now, read more about it here: audio-spectrum-analyzer-v2-1-t127.html

The V2 and the V2.1 that is coming out soon use a tricky technique for getting the required bands. It involves using RC filters, where the R is replaced with a digital pot. For that reason we can't obtain and center on any frequency that we would like. We're constrained by hardware to use those frequencies. Its not FFT cause that would of been easier to set on different frequency's. V3 will definitely have FFT, but it needs a bit more work.
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Re: Questions: Spectrum Analyzer

Postby Twistedpair » Sat 13 Nov , 2010 6:34 am

Hello hh97, just a note regarding displaying the lower frequencies on the V2 analyzer. I have a small recording studio and I'm running the V2 as an overall display for the playback mix and I find that it works very well with respect to the very, very expensive analyzer's out there, which I have used here in the past. The mix is mastered on my mixing board, then sent through a few audio enhancer's, then on to the V2 for an overview of the primary mix, and then back to a computer for final assignment. What is important to know here is that the frequencies below 100hz will reflect it's boost's or cuts in the 100hz range. For example, if the V2 is visually displaying a boost in the 100hz/ 200hz range etc, the lower frequencies will be slightly higher, and if the 100hz/200hz have been cut, the lower frequencies can be expected to be lower. I take my lower frequencies down to an earth rumbling 30hz. Of coarse my recording software in my computer reinforce's what the V2 is telling me. I just look at the V2's lower display bands for a reference as to what's happening with the 30hz and up frequencies. If you go to the Users Photo's section in the forum, and look at my rack, the V2 is displaying what I'm describing here. I'm not sure what your particular needs are visually but I'm very happy with my V2, and so is my bank account. Just had to add my thoughts here.

Twistedpair....

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Re: Questions: Spectrum Analyzer

Postby tomzarbo » Sat 08 Jan , 2011 7:35 pm

hh97 wrote:Hi Florin,
Your analyser looks very good! I'm super impressed :D
My question is will future versions be able to show the bass audio frequencies in audio such as below 100Hz/cycles per second?
If it could show a range more like the ⅓ octave frequency range that would be really great! :) :D :D


I did notice that the low end of the spectrum was 100 Hz, which seems high, but I think with most music, it would be a pretty good representation of what is really happening.

With the exception of some digital music which sometimes use something similar to pure sine waves, most instruments that are capable of producing deep bass in the 30-50 Hz range also produce harmonics that are quite a bit higher. Those harmonics would take care of any supposed lack of "output" in terms of the 100 Hz light column lighting up during those passages.

Also as was previously stated, an equalizer or spectrum analyzer 'band' centered on 100 Hz would still 'represent' frequencies higher and lower than that centered band by a few dozen Hz usually. Think of a standard bell curve, with a peak centered on 100 Hz with decreasing sensitivity as you travel higher and lower from that 100 Hz peak and I think you have a good idea of what is happening.

I don't know how this particular display samples it's frequencies, but every one I've ever encountered worked this way. I wouldn't mind seeing a lower band in the 50's or 60's, that may work better, but I think 100 Hz is okay. In truth, there is really very little output in most music in the 20's and 30's. 20 Hz isn't even 'hearable' and 30 Hz barely so. The 40's and up is usually what we consider 'bass' for most purposes. My home theater uses four 12" high-excursion subwoofers ported, tuned to 18 Hz. I can achieve in room volumes of 118 db at 20 Hz with a sine wave. I can't really start hearing the bass until it hits the mid-thirties. Below that stuff in the room is just shaking. Sine waves are good for demonstrating what a certain frequency actually sounds like, and as far as bass is concerned, they show how low the 'low' bass really is.

TomZ
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Re: Questions: Spectrum Analyzer

Postby Florin » Sun 06 Mar , 2011 7:52 am

Tom, very nice description of how the low frequency's behave.
That is actually how the spectrum analyzer works, its not perfectly centered on one window (ie 100Hz) it catches adjacent frequency's also plus or minus 50Hz depending on the exact frequency.

The 100Hz for the lower frequency was set by testing and practice and I observed that the spectrum analyzer would perform okay with that lower frequency.

Thanks.
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