The goal for this project was to build it with mostly parts that I had in my lab instead of designing or buying something special so for this reason some hacking had to be done.

Another VoltLog InTheMail, this time I receive the following items:

  • ICR18650-26F 2600mAh 3.6V Rechargeable Li-ion Battery
  • NCR18650B 3400mAh 3.7V Rechargeable Li-ion Battery
  • 3S JST connector cable
  • DC-DC 0.9V-5V USB Output Charger Step Up Power Module
  • ESD Anti-Static Shielding ZIP LOCK Bags
  • Mifare RC522 RFID Induction Reader Module
  • 100 Pcs 0805 SMD LED Diode 5 Colors
  • Original Xiaomi 5000mAh Ultra-thin 9.9mm Power Bank
  • TI Precision Amplifier Quickstart Kit AMPQUICKKIT-EVM: OPA313, OPA314, OPA316, OPA170, OPA171, OPA172

Links for all of these are in the video description on YouTube.

A while ago, Francesca from Element 14 kindly contacted me to ask if I wanted to receive some products from their catalog for review. I said yes and since I already had a wishlist going on (as most electronics guys have) it was easy to pick up some products. I also considered current and future projects when picking the items and so I had 4 items:

I asked for the STM32VLDISCOVERY because I wanted to play with one of these ever since I discovered this STM32 book written by Geoffrey Brown. The book seems so nicely written and from a practical point of view seems like it will get me started and working on the STM32 in no time. I’m also working on a couple of projects right now for which the STM32 might seem like overkill but I might use it anyway just build some experience around this chip.

I asked for the ATXMEGAA3BU-XPLD because it is a nice platform all around. The MCU is the ATxmega256A3BU and you also get some analog sensors, an lcd display and lots of IO’s. Excellent for when you need to throw something together and test it on an Atmel ATXmega. The ATSAM4L-XPRO which I received in error, features Atmel’s ATSAM4LC4C Cortex-M4 MCU which is nonetheless interesting in the industry but isn’t of much use to me on it’s own without some expansion board.

The TPS54231EVM-372 and TPS5450EVM-254 from Texas Instruments were requested because I use both of these in two of my projects and I wanted to have a reference testing platform for comparison to my own implementation in layout and design. I use the TPS54231 in the new Audio Spectrum Analyzer to power the digital/LED section and I use the TPS5450 in my DIY digital power supply as the switching  pre-regulator before going into a linear reg.

More will follow on these as I am going to perform some measurements like output noise on the TPS54231EVM-372 and TPS5450EVM-254 using my entry level scope and compare the results with the ones from the datasheet.

Also if you would like to checkout more products from these manufacturers, see the Newark category pages:

December 13th, 2008

Texas Instruments Samples

Today my order of samples from Texas Instruments arrived. Nicely packed in antistatic bags, i got the following parts:

  • TAS5414A – 4-Channel Automotive Digital Amplifiers
  • AMC6821 – Temperature Monitoring and Fan Control
  • TPA6120A2 – High Fidelity Stereo Headphone Amplifier
  • PGA4311 – 4-Channel, +/-5V Audio Volume Control
  • TMP100 – Digital Temperature Sensor with I2C Serial Interface

TI, was very nice trough the delivery steps, they even gave me a call and told me that if i need support in finishing up the project i should send an email to their support and they will happily answer my questions.

I’m planing on building a nice amp with that TAS5414A, I’ll post details here, later when I’ll get started working on the amp.



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